Write Songs with 2 5 1 Chord Progressions

Write Songs with 2 5 1 Chord Progressions


In our last video series we discussed triad chords. In this series we focus on how to use those triad chords to write your own music using chord progressions. This series will cover some different fingerings making 2 5 1 Chord Progressions.


The 2 5 1 chord progression, also referred to as II – V – I is a common chord sequence used in a wide variety of music and genres and is best known in Jazz harmony. This progression follows its roots up in 4ths. For example in the key of C major the II chord would be Dm traveling to the V chord G major and finally to the I chord C major. If using four part chords this example would be the II chord Dm7 traveling to the V chord G7 and finally to the I chord Cmaj7 . Another term that can be used would be the supertonic the II chord Dominant the V chord and finally the Tonic the I chord.


The 2 5 1 chord progression can also be used in the Harmonic Minor key. For example in the key of C harmonic minor the II chord would be diminished traveling to the V chord G major and finally to the I chord C minor. If using four part chords this example would be the II chord Dm7b5 traveling to the V chord G7 and finally to the I chord Cm maj7 or Cm .


In addition to the Major scale and the Harmonic minor scale (from where all these chords are derived from ) we can implement the Melodic minor scale 2 5 1 chord progression For example in the key of C melodic minor the II chord would be D minor traveling to the V chord G major and finally to the I chord C minor. If using four part chords this example would be the II chord Dm7 traveling to the V chord G7 and finally to the I chord Cm maj7 or Cm6 . By far the most popular and the most used is the 2 5 1 chord progression in a major key followed by a 2 5 1 chord progression in the Harmonic minor key.


Now that we have established the 2 5 1 chord progression using all diatonic notes derived from their perspective key, we can now use extensions (diatonic ally) to enhance the original chords. Also you can use altered notes (non diatonic) to enhance and change the original quality of the chord. Jazz players rely on this concept heavily to make the music richer in harmony, which then allows for altered scales to be played over these new chords.


In this video series we will stick to using triads (three part chords) moving up and down the neck of the guitar, using closed voicing’s ( notes that do not skip a string when played ). This will be an excellent beginning to properly set up 2 5 1 chord progressions using four note voicing’s.


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Videos Below

Intro

Lesson 1

2 5 1 Chord Progression Lesson 1

Lesson 2

2 5 1 Chord Progression Lesson 2

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